God gives us to each other without asking our permission

Catching up on Bishop Lane’s recent sermons:

On November 16, he visited St. John’s in Bangor and had this, in part, to say in his sermon about the parable of the talents:

“…what do we think of God? Who is God? Is God loving and merciful, one who will take our best efforts and use them? Or is God fierce, demanding and punishing, waiting to judge our failures and our mistakes? How we perceive God may very well determine our willingness to invest ourselves in the work of the kingdom.”

Last Thursday, the congregations of Christ Church, Norway, and Trinity Lutheran, South Paris, gathered to celebrate the Rev. Nancy Moore coming to be their rector and pastor. In his sermon, Bishop Lane said:

“The first is to recognize that although, as you already know, Nancy is a gifted priest and pastor, this work is not primarily about her. This work is primarily about us and our claiming the ministry of Christ. Christianity has always been a lay movement, and it remains so today. While Nancy is called to preach and teach, to celebrate the sacraments, to support us with pastoral care, the work of Christ belongs to all of us. And rightly so – the kingdom of God requires all the gifts we bring. None of us is sufficient alone to do the work of Christ. All of us, bringing all our gifts, make up the Body of Christ and make the Body effective. Every person and every gift is needed. This service tonight is as much a commissioning of all of you, as it is of Nancy.”

And on Last Pentecost, November 23, Bishop Lane gathered with the people of St. Giles’ in Jefferson where he had some new words about the ancient parable of the sheep and the goats.

“There was a time, not so long ago, when we believed that the good people were all found in the Church offering charity to those in need. We were all sheep. Except that we were often quite unneighborly in many ways. We didn’t actually know the folks we helped, we weren’t in relationship with them. We weren’t very kind to other Christians – Baptists or Roman Catholics – with whom we differed over doctrines or spiritual practices. We weren’t even always nice to each other. Our churches were hard to break into. One had to learn the unwritten rules and conform to the expectations of the established members. One wonders how often Christ tried to join our churches only to be turned away.”

You may read the sermons all here.

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